DICK CLARK R.I.P. ROCK IN PERPETUITY!

April 19, 2012

LIKE EVERY KID IN THE LATE FIFTIES, I GREW UP WITH AMERICAN BANDSTAND AS A SAFE PLACE TO GO WHEN I WAS CHASED HOME AFTER SCHOOL. THE DANCERS WERE BROTHERS AND SISTERS I NEVER HAD, AND DICK CLARK WAS THE FATHER I NEVER KNEW.

IN MY SPECTROPOP INTERVIEW WITH PRODUCER JERRY ROSS (“SUNNY”, “SUNDAY WILL NEVER BE THE SAME”, “98.6”) JERRY REMEMBERS DICK,

“When I was starting out, One of my instructors took a liking to me and she set up a live on-camera audition with the general manager of WFIL-TV, Jack Steck. He handed me a copy of the Daily News and said, “OK, now ad lib.” AW: And then what? JR: They hired me! I found out that they had just fired the host of the local Bandstand show, Bob Horn, that day, and brought in radio personality Dick Clark to replace him. Dick had an afternoon DJ show called the Caravan Of Music and played artists like Joni James, the Four Aces and Tony Bennett. Dick didn’t know Chuck Berry from a strawberry! But, he learned very quickly by surrounding himself with local and national promotion people, who knew where the hits were happening – Red Schwartz, Matty Singer, Danny Davis. Dick was doing both shows, so I took over as DJ for Caravan Of Music three days a week. I was a DJ for WFIL radio, and then I would go over to the TV studio and do the station breaks, introduce Dick and do some commercials for Bandstand!  AW: [Laughs] Sounds like they had you running! JR: Two months later the TV show went national and became American Bandstand! I was one of Dick’s first announcers. I was staff there for about two years.  AW: Those were the golden years of Bandstand – the first national TV show that was totally dedicated to playing pop music! JR: Between the charisma of the kid’s dancing – they were the stars – that great “music of your life” and the “Dick Clark appeal”, the show just exploded! During that time, we didn’t have a green room, and all of the top artists of the day – Bobby Darin, Chubby Checker, Connie Francis, Pat Boone, Neil Sedaka – would come in and hang out in my booth with their managers and promotion people while waiting to go on the show. So I got to meet a lot of movers and shakers early on.”

ABOUT TWENTY  LATER I WAS OUT IN MALIBU VISITING MY FRIEND AND CLIENT RADIO SPOT MAKER JOE KLEIN…

Joe Klein NMC Website HeadshotWe were walking down the beach when we run across a couple of girls from Pepperdine, who tell us about a party at Dick Clark’s house. I always wanted to meet, one of  America’s most popular DJs, TV hosts, and creator of the American Music Awards, and there’s no better time than now. As we boldly walk into his house, I tell Joe I that I don’t know Dick, but just act like we belong there. Then a suspicious Charlie O’Donnell, Dick’s long time announcer, walks over to us. I shake his hand and tell him we met in Mel Bly’s office, up at Warner Brothers Music. He breaks into a smile, and welcomes us to Dick’s private birthday party, and takes us in to meet the man himself! We wish him a Happy Birthday, and he acts as if he’s known us all of our lives. Although he’s been talking to some of his friends, he takes a few minutes to bring a couple of ice teas over to Joe and me, who are sitting on the couch. As Dick leans down to hand me the tall frosty glass, I imagine that the drink is a microphone, and he is interviewing me on American Bandstand. I suddenly have an urge to say, “I’m Artie Wayne, from the East Bronx, and I go to the High School of Music and Art.”, I but I don’t. I learned a long time ago that by sometimes saying less, you can leave more of an impression.

Joe Klein…Radio and TV commercial producer

*

Dear Artie, In 1963,after growing up watching American Bandstand ,Steve Duboff,my writing partner and I fond ourselves with a top 40 hit called “The Pied Piper”.There we were performing on Dicks show.After the show Mr.Clark requited that we meet him and wanted to talk about our unusual success landing all the even minor hits we had.He was a gentleman and gracious.I flashed back to watching Bandstand and then running out to buy “Get a Job”.Bandstand built my record collection and lit the fires that led to mr success making music.

Peace, Artie Kornfeld…”THE FATHER OF WOODSTOCK” (“THE RAIN, THE PARK AND OTHER THINGS”)
DICK CLARK WAS MORE THAN JUST A HOST AND MADE STARS OF A LOT OF ARTIST. THEY ALL TALK ABOUT HOW HE WAS THE BEST HOST WHICH HE WAS AND WHAT HE DID FOR THEM AS FAR AS A CAREER. DICK’S FAMILY AND MY FAMILY WERE VERY CLOSE FRIENDS HIS KIDS AND MY KIDS PLAYED TOGETHER. HE WAS THE VERY BEST!!!!   MY FAMILY WILL MISS HIM. MY HEART GOES OUT TO KARI AND THE CHILDREN  ROCK ON DICK
FREDDY BOOM BOOM CANNON…(“PALISADES PARK”, “WAY DOWN YONDER IN NEW ORLEANS”) 
L to R…PHIL EVERLY, JACKIE WILSON, DON EVERLY, AND CLYDE McPHATTER
Hi Artie
I loved Dick Clark!
He was always great
To me!  He definitely
Helped  in the making
Of many superstars!
And he was one himself!
 Russ  Regan…(Elton John, Barry White)
In 1970 when Don Fischel and I started Heller-Fischel andIrvingwas our Junior Agent Dick Clark was our 1st Landlord at 9120 Sunset Blvd. $150.00 dollars a month and on Fridays he would bring us Lunch. Paull Revere and The Raiders were right up the hall. Dick was the kindest, nicest most respectful human being that I ever met. He set the bar at the very highest level of Humanity, Class and GOOD TASTE. I never, ever saw him turn any of us down when we came to him for a favor. NEVER. I mean, my God people “HE WAS DICK CLARK”, he didnn’t HAVE to help anyone. When I’d see him over the years at Events, etc. I always felt the same warmth eminate from his persona. Hey man, THANKS FOR EVERYTHING, R.I.P. and enjoy your next life, UPSTAIRS, my brother. YOU PERSONIFY ROCK AND ROLL.
JERRY HELLER

Lenny Welch…”YOU DON”T KNOW ME”…Hi Artie, The first time I met Dick Clark I was 19 years old . My hit record at the time was “YOU DON’T KNOW ME” . His show was in Philadelphiaat the time and his office was no bigger than a small closet. I was very nervous at the time but he put me at ease. Since that time , I have done his show many times and he was always kind to me. In my day, if you wanted to see who was singing the hit songs you liked, you would turn on Dick Clark.
There will never be another Dick Clark. Lenny Welch 
THE  SKYLINERS… “SINCE I DON’T HAVE YOU”
Bruce Belland…Four Preps…(“26 MILES”)…What can you say – a great friend of mine and the Preps. A generous, brilliant and decent guy. I’ll miss him dearly..
Bruce Belland
Dick Clark, what can we say about this wonderful man, one of the very many remembrances we will always have in our hearts is that every time we appeared on American Bandstand Dick would stop by our dressing room, stick his head in and very loudly say to us “Gentlemen, gentlemen!”, he would say this every time we went on his show and we would always laugh. One day on another of our appearances Dick stuck his head in the dressing room door again and said “Gentlemen, gentlemen!”, this time we playfully pulled him in and said “Dick why do you always say “Gentlemen, gentlemen!” every time we come on your show, he looked at us with a playful and mischievousness look and said “I just want to make sure you’re all still gentlemen before you go on”!!!!, we all fell on the floor in fits of laughter!!,
God bless Dick Clark, with love and respect. From the Commodores. WAK, Clyde, and J.D.

JIGGS- THE ANGELS (“MY BOYFRIENDS BACK”) I remember what a thrill it was to do the Dick Clark Show back in the early 60′s. I was recently looking at pictures taken at those shows. It was even better years later doing concerts with him at casinos and other huge venues. I used to make up stories about Dick and us in the back seat of some old classic car and got great response from the audiences. I believe he has been totally taken for granted as he was always around on TV in one production or other. He will always be with us because of his legacy, but will be greatly missed by those of us who directly benefited from his brilliance.

Best, Jiggs

                                                       HERE’S BOBBY DARIN AND “MACK THE KNIFE”
Hey Artie, Dick was a real good friend, and he’s going to be missed
Lloyd Price…”PERSONALITY”, “STAGGER LEE”)
 *
I am glad for the opportunity to briefly eulogize such a special person.  I was lucky enough to go from being a teenager watching AB on a black & white Sylvania TV, to actually appearing 3 times on the show.  Dick Clark was always cordial & professional, even working up a little on-air “piece of business” about having a stagehand toss me a large pillow so I could sit a little higher on the piano bench.  But beyond my personal experience, here was a man who did a great deal for racial integration, quietly but powerfully, with the artists he featured (not to mention, eventually, the dancers).  This “equal opportunity music” was so important to America as a country, and set a great standard.  

And thank you, Dick Clark, for enriching my life!
 
Fondly Alan O’Day…(“UNDERCOVER ANGEL”, “ANGIE BABY”, “ROCK AND ROLL HEAVEN”)
*
Tony Orlando (“TIE A YELLOW RIBBON”, “KNOCK THREE TIMES”): “Only God is responsible for making more stars than Dick Clark.”
 
R.I.P., Dick, Tony Orlando
Artie–When i was 15 growing up in Philly, a couple of buddies were going out with a few girls from South Philly who danced on Bandstand Friday afternoons. Somehow I got talked into going because the girls could get us in. Dick Clark was the epitome of suave. And he was nice when the camera was off, too. That day I was determined to stay in the bleachers but I gave in when I was dragged on the dance floor for  slow song. While dancing I got the button on my jacket sleeve stuck in my partner’s hair. When the record ended we were still stuck and of course Dick was standing next to us with his mike and a camera. Could be the most embarrassing moment of my youth.--Rich Podolsky, author of  “Don Kirshner: The Man with the Golden Ear.” (RJP2001@aol.com)
 JERRY LEE DEBUTS  “GREAT BALLS OF FIRE” ON THE DICK CLARK SATURDAY NIGHT SHOW  

To me Dick was a class act all the way in all ways. He was someone who not only brought the music to us, but loved the music and those who made it. I was lucky enough to spend some time with him and he was a lovely man. He truly appreciated songs and songwritiers. And did so much for both. RIP Dick.
DIANE WARREN…(“UNBREAK MY HEART”, “HOW CAN I LIVE WITHOUT YOU?”)
 L to R…Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Bo Diddley
click onto  “SWEET LITTLE SIXTEEN” BY CHUCK BERRY  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhcDCZv1mwY&feature=related
Julia Negronremember the very first New Year’s Rocking Eve… with guests Three Dog Night! http://entertainment.time.com/2011/12/30/dick-clark-photos-in-memory-of-an-american-icon/?iid=ent-category-mostpop1#clark_02
L to R…CHUCK NEGRON, COREY WELLS, AND DANNY HUTTON…THREE DOG NIGHT
Allee Willis…(“BOOGIE WONDERLAND”, “I’LL BE THERE FOR YOU”) Sorry, Artie. I’m on tour and going NUTS!! Here’s my tribute to a beautiful man: What would childhood have been without Dick Clark? Like everyone else my age or around it I raced home from school to dance with Bandstand. I totally lived for that show and it certainly influenced what became of me. Dick Clark left an indelible mark on pop culture that changed it for everyone who came after. R.I.P. Dick Clark, a legend among legends.

“WHEN I WAS A STAFF WRITER FOR ALDON MUSIC, I WOULD STAY HOME ON THURSDAY AND REPORT BY PHONE TO DONNY KIRSHNER HOW WELL THEIR SONGS WERE RATED ON AMERICAN BANDSTAND (AT THE TIME YOU COULDN’T GET GOOD TV RECEPTION AT 1650 BROADWAY)

EVERYTIME ONE OF THE KIDS SAID THEY GIVE AN ALDON SONG THE HIGHEST RATING BECAUSE THEY COULD DANCE TO IT, I’D HEAR CHEERS OVER THE PHONE FROM DONNY, CAROLE KING, NEIL SEDAKA, AND JACK KELLER…”

ARTIE WAYNE

Dick Clark was an icon and the bridge for many generations. Always decent, always consistant, always making othe people comfortable.

It was an honor to work and play with Dick, whether on American Bandstand, traveling with him on tour, or just being his friend out of the spotlight. He helped me and many of my friends become part of Rock & Roll History.

Dick, we will all miss you. Lou Christie “LIGHTNING STRIKES”, “TWO FACES HAVE I”

 ROGER McGUINN THE BYRDS…”MR. TAMBOURENE MAN”…GOD BLESS YOU!
being on AB was a delight. the whole show dedictated to the music and the fans…..and dick clark was the first to do it in such a big manner. certainly the first to celebrate the spirit of the new music and those who welcomed and lived it. I’ve always doubted whether he would have been so succesful had he tried to be anythign else than what he was….no weird outfit or hip DJ name, not even from a hip trend setting town. a strangely perfect delivery system for parents and cautious broadcasters. One of the unique things about Dick Clark
was his absolute attention to the details of his guests. He had savant level retention for names and little personal facts. Another icon in the biz with that kind of capacity is Clive Davis….almost total retention of all he takes in. Strange that both of them were so straight, so not musicians themselves, but had such unelivable impact on transcultural aesthetics. One of my favorite takes on Dick was offered by Johnny Carson who imagined Clark getting home from another day of Show Biz moguldom, stepping into his Malibu beach front home…his wife handing him favorite cocktail, they chat for a minute and then he steps out of his house, walks across the beach sand step into the surf and takes a sunset walk upon the water….. what a symbol of exciting times past!
Terry Kirkman..THE ASSOCIATION (“CHERISH”, “WINDY”)
 
L -R…BRUCE JOHNSTON, AL JARDINE, BRIAN WILSON,AND MIKE LOVE…THE BEACH BOYS
Jimmy Clanton (“JUST A DREAM”)…How well I remember that Dick presented me with my gold record for ‘Just a Dream…and , of course, the countless times I was on BANDSTAND.
 
 
                              DICK CLARK AND MICHAEL JACKSON
Today I have lost my good friend, Dick Clark. Without him, I would not have had a career in the music business.  He was always there for me whenever I called him on the phone. We’d sit in his office and just recall the wonderful early years of rock and roll. Without Dick Clark, rock and roll music would have never had the impact that it had. Because of American Bandstand the world was introduced to all of the great rock and roll artists that appeared on his show.  On a recent CD that I just put out of my music, Dick wrote some of the liner notes.  He was a good friend and I cannot even put into words how much I loved him and how much I will miss him.  Rest in peace my good friend.  
John Madara…Songwriter/Producer (“AT THE HOP”, “ROCK AND ROLL IS HERE TO STAY”)
click on to watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8dEn6qCecg
Hi Artie,
I was shocked and saddened by Dick’s passing. I didn’t expect it.  He seemed to be on the mend. He was a good friend and a great benefactor to me and so many others. He created my career and was always there for me when I called upon him. I know he was not happy dealing with his infirmities, but now I believe he is whole again in his spiritual state.
All the Best, Dave White…Danny and the Juniors… (“AT THE HOP”, “ROCK AND ROLL IS HERE TO STAY”)
            *

HERE’S CHUBBY AND “THE TWIST”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?

v=BeD8Rp-6_vc

Remembering Dick Clark, who gave generations the chance to dance!

By Dawn Lee Wakefield of the National Examiner  Classic Rock Music Examiner

Baby boomers and music lovers have lost another icon today, as Dick Clark, host of “American Bandstand,” is dead, at age 82. WKYT, the CBS affiliate inPhiladelphia announced that Mr. Clark’s representative, Paul Shefrin, said that the perennially youthfulClark “had suffered a massive heart attack” and died. CNN reporter Alan Duke noted that the death occurred during an outpatient procedure atSt. John’sHospital inSanta Monica. Just 10 years ago this week, Mr. Clark had hosted the taping of “American Bandstand’s 50th: A Celebration” program at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium inPasadena,California.

Unquestionably, his passing strikes a chord in the hearts of four decades of teenage viewers, who grew up watching “American Bandstand,” with Mr. Clark as their favorite host. In the industry of showcasing great rock and roll music, Mr. Clark reigned supreme. He presented chart-topping recording artists each week, as he brought national stars into your own living room with such frequency that you never wanted to miss a broadcast. He also introduced the country to new, up and coming artists, who were destined to become household names. The “Bandstand” show itself had a format that was ever as much as a showcase for initially unknown Philadelphia high school students to be considered “the dancers to emulate,” as teenagers across the country learned how to do the latest steps by watching the teens each week. Dick Clark gave all of us a chance to dance.

Continue reading on Examiner.com Remembering Dick Clark, who gave generations the chance to dance – National classic rock music | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/classic-rock-music-in-national/remembering-dick-clark-who-gave-generations-the-chance-to-dance#ixzz1sSAbiNNG

EXTRA! WHILE SEARCHING FOR SOME AMERICAN BANDSTAND VIDEOS I FOUND A 14 MINUTE CLIP OF THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW IN 1982…WHICH IS EXTRAORDAINARY                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E5xy6gjnt4&feature=related

EXTRA! EXTRA!! THEN I FOUND A RALPH EDWARDS “THIS IS YOUR LIFE” FEATURING DICK CLARK THAT WAS JUST POSTED WITH ONLY 33 VIEWS SO FAR! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgPxz1VNU0E&feature=related

BARRY MANILOW TELLS THE STORY AND SINGS THE AMERICAN BANDSTAND THEME http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-2Zgc8Aqug

L to R – DICK CLARK, FABIAN, BOBBY RYDELL, AND FRANKIE AVALON

Thank you Dick Clark for all that you’ve given us R.I.P., MAY YOU ROCK IN PERPETUITY!

Respectfully, Artie Wayne   http://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2012/04/10/celebrating-two-million-views-today-on-artie-wayne-on-the-web/

HERE’S THE SONG THAT PAYS TRIBUTE TO DICK AND ALL OF HIS FRIENDS WHO ARE NO LONGER HERE. WRITTEN BY ALAN O’DAY AND JOHNNY STEVENSON, “ROCK AND ROLL HEAVEN” VOCAL BY RONNIE KIMBALL

Copyright 2012 by Artie Wayne

BACK TO ARTIE WAYNE ON THE WEB  http://artiewayne.wordpress.com

54 Responses to “DICK CLARK R.I.P. ROCK IN PERPETUITY!”

  1. Artie Wayne Says:

    Transcribed from e-mails and comments on FACEBOOK…

    The passing of Dick Clark is the end of an era. He was so good to so many of us who appeared on his various shows. As a kid, my two dreams were to play the Apollo and appear on American Bandstand. I did the Apollo at 23 but it took until age 42 to make it to Bandstand.

    Like Johnny Carson and very few others, Dick’s way of interviewing was to make you the star, unlike today’s hosts who draw attention to themselves instead.

    He never forgot the old “regulars” who we kids knew by name. He stayed in touch with the ones who made him and never forgot. He helped the former stars who were with him at the beginning. He once cast me in a sitcom pilot he was producing for Frankie Avalon. I could hear his wonderful laugh from the audience everytime we said something funny.

    He used me on a number of his shows and even came to see us at one of our club gigs, which his wife Kari told me was something he very rarely did.

    Rock’n’roll may never have made the national impact were it not for Dick Clark. In that sense, the world owes a great debt to Dick Clark.

    Billy Vera

    Artie – what I remember about Bandstand was that they aired the Edwin Hawkins Singers’ ‘Oh Happy Day’ for the kids to dance to – to a GOSPEL song! Who would’ve thought that was possible but it was just another example of how eclectic Bandstand’s programming was.

    That happening was meaningful to me as I was the VP & Head of Promotion at Buddah Records and we were distributing ‘Oh Happy Day.’ And sure enough, Bandstand’s airing of it broke it nationally.

    Marty Thau

    Fraser Loveman…Dick played the soundtrack of my life!

  2. Dan S. White Says:

    Artie, thank you very much for this article. I am still trying to cope with this sudden and tragic loss. Dick Clark was and always will be an inspiration and mentor to me. He was a great influence on my life in many ways for nearly four decades and will always remain a major fan of his. Dick Clark’s life, and all of his contributions to the industry, and all the great Dick Clark memories through video, audio, pictures and Television will live on forever. He will be greatly missed worldwide!

  3. Evie Sands Says:

    Sad to hear about Dick Clark’s passing yesterday…
    Whenever I did one of his shows, I can honestly say, he was always the most gracious host, easygoing, very kind and supportive. It made doing his show a pleasure – every time! R.I.P…


  4. The best part of being sick and staying home from school was being able to watch “American Bandstand.” Always an originator, never saw him be anything but nice to people, he was understatedly unique. Later on, he displayed courage and determination since his stroke. I was so proud to see him put all that energy into his last few New Year’s Eve appearances and know how hard that had to be. Guts and grace.

  5. Harry M Says:

    R.I.P. Dick Clark from this Philly boy. He always amazed me with his genuine enthusiasm for music and artists. I learned a lot from Dick and Bandstand…Thanks Dick!!!

  6. Robbie Leff Says:

    Great stuff here, Artie.
    I can’t even imagine my childhood without American Bandstand.
    “It’s got a good beat, you can dance to it.”
    May he rest in peace…
    or maybe get up and rock with Buddy, Ritchie and The Big Bopper.

  7. Art Fein Says:

    He adamantly pushed for race mixing. I saw more black acts on Bandstand than anywhere else on tv – by tenfold. For that alone, he should be canonized.

  8. Jim Holvay Says:

    I had the pleasure and honor of being the guitarist in the Dick Clark Caravan of Stars band, ’64/’65.
    Dick rode on the bus with all of the acts and musicians, even though there were some headliners that would ride in a limo that followed the bus.
    We made a swing through the south on one of the tours. It was a long jump from one city to the next and we stopped in the middle of the night to get something to eat. Everybody was starving and we all ran into the truck stop, not really thinking of where we were. We were tired and just anxious to get something to eat.
    When we all walked in, the waitress looked like she’d seen a ghost.
    She said, “We ain’t servin’ no n_ _ _ er’s in here.”
    Dick blew a fuse and said, “If you don’t serve these folks I’m going to buy this place and fire all of you.”
    There was a handful of redneck truckers in there eating, with country music playing on the jukebox, the whole 9 yards. You could cut the tension with a knife. I thought the whole place was going to go up for grabs.
    We got our food to go and went back to the bus.
    After my time with the tours, I formed a band called The MOB.
    We had 2 singles that charted on Billboard, I think in the low 80’s. Certainly not enough to warrant a national television appearance but Dick booked us on American Bandstand.
    Fast forward to 1984 and I was working as a salesman for an office equipment company. Dick Clark Productions in Burbank was one of my accounts.
    Hoping he would remember me, I told the receptionist to tell Dick that I was in the lobby.
    He told the receptionist to have me come back to his office.
    We sat and reminisced about the tours.
    I also heard that Dick picked-up the hospital tab for the entire time that Jackie Wilson was in a coma.
    Years later, Cornell Gunther’s died in Las Vegas and Dick paid for his funeral expenses.
    I’m sorry Dick. I know you wouldn’t want anyone to know about how giving of a person you were.
    Rest in peace my friend.

  9. Joel Diamond Says:

    Having grown up with American Bandstand, it was truly one of the thrills of my life having co-produced a Network TV Show, side by side, with Dick Clark: “The Family Film Awards” – one of the sweetest and kindest men I have ever met
    Joel Diamond

  10. Marva Holiday Says:

    Hey there Artie, — I grew up in South Los Angeles, far away from Philadelphia, but I would RUSH home from Bret Harte Jr. High to watch “Bandstand” before starting my homework. — Mr. Clark’s show introduced me to a lot of new music and I even learned to “Bristol Stomp” by watching the dancers. — Dick Clark was the perfect host. He never overshadowed his guests and seemed really interested in all of them. As a woman of color, it was great to grow up seeing a lot of minority artists featured on a national T.V. show and he never treated them any differently than the other artists. They all got that same trademark smile :-) – Rest in Peace Mr. Clark. Memories of you and your wonderful show are indelibly etched in the scrapbook of my mind. Thoughts and prayers go out to the family. Marva Holiday

  11. Bill Cuomo Says:

    Artie, it’s tough to quickly sum up all the great things Dick Clark was. Nice, kind, benevolent, fair, approachable…….a classy guy all the way. I remember watching the bandstand show back in the late fifties and seeing all my favorite acts and hoping some day that I might appear on his show. Years later I got the chance. Dick was always the guy to put everyone at ease and for all the power he had in the business, he always put it to good use, whether financially taking care of Jackie Wilson while in a coma or championing for civil rights. He’d never mention that of course because he was far too modest to boast. I can’t say enough good things about him and I, amongst millions of others, mourn his passing. R.I.P. Mr. Clark, you were the best.
    Bill Cuomo

  12. Jack Carone Says:

    I read his book, ” Rock, Roll and Remember” numerous times. There was lots of ground to break, and Mr. Clark sure broke it. An important chunk of our generation has left the auditorium, but we will never forget him.

  13. Jerry Love Says:

    Dick Clark was an Icon when I was in promotion and always treated me as a freind..Lots of acts on Bandstand that I went with…R.I.P.

  14. Dave White Says:

    Hi Artie,I was shocked and saddened by Dick’s passing. I didn’t expect it.

    He seemed to be on the mend. He was a good friend and a great benefactor to me and so many others.

    He created my career and was always there for me when I called upon him.

    I know he was not happy dealing with his infirmities, but now I believe he is whole again in his spiritual state.

    All the Best,

    Dave

  15. Eddie Hodges Says:

    Hi Artissimo,
    What a sad day for us all – especially those of us that met Dick Clark at some time and experienced the awesome nature of The Gentleman of Rock ‘n’ Roll. I first appeared with Dick on The Bandstand in Philadelphia. I was just a punk kid with a new record and he was an up and coming ex-DJ with a new kind of TV show (that I watched every day in New York, by the way). Later, he had me on Bandstand with every record I released, always the gracious host, becoming more gracious and kind as time went by, if you can imagine that. He was so happy bringing rock artists to the public on his show and to do anything he could to help new acts get exposure. He invited me to guest on a Pilot he did for the great Casey Kasem – that was an absolute blast, and gave me a chance to see the incrediblly talented Dick Clark as a Director, Producer and businessman. I visited his offices many times – he was always gracious and welcoming. What a wonderful man and friend to everyone in popular music. A pioneer who stood up for artists in the music business no matter the cost. There will never be another mentor to the entire pop music business like he was. May light perpetual shine on Dick Clark, the Gentleman of Rock ‘n’ Roll, and give him peace. My heart weeps tonight with a host of others who crossed paths with him.

    Eddie Hodges

  16. Artie Wayne Says:

    Transcribed from LIKES on FACEBOOK…

    CLINT GREER, PHIL BARTON, STAN MORESS, AISHA YOSHI, SYLVIA MEISTER WENGROW, TERRY REEVES RODDY, JEAN CHERAMIE, OME MYLES, TEIRA DOOM, DENISE MONTECARLO, ALVIN EPSTEIN, JEAN LAMOND, FRASER LOVEMAN, SHIRLEY ROTHMAN, SHIRLEY GERHARD, CHARLES JONES, EDWIN LOPEZ, CARMEN JENKINS, EDWARD ARREY, DWIGHT TWILLEY, BILL CUOMO, BODGE HYATT, Shigemi Ashizawa , JOSEPH PYTELL, PATTI GREEN, SHIGEMI ASHIWAZA,

    Transcribed from E-MAILS and COMMENTS on FACEBOOK…

    I went to a party for Dick at the Hard Rock. I hadn’t seen him in many years so I was ready to re-introduce myself to him when he struck out his hand and said, “Great to see you, Paul”. What a memory that man had!

    When I got a my very first video tape recorder I asked my friend who worked for him to see if Dick would send tapes of any of my performances to me. Three days later – a knock on the door – a messenger, bringing me the tapes I asked for.

    In his book, “Rock, Roll, and Remember”, Dick Clark gives me credit for inadvertently giving Bobby Rydell’s career a boost. For one of his Saturday shows, Dick needed someone from the audience to play the part of Fred and sit in the back seat of my car. Who did he pull from the audience? The still unknown Bobby Rydell.

    When I was putting together my first CD compilation, I phoned Dick and asked if he would send me a quote for the CD. He got a quote to me in days and told me to paraphrase the quote in any way that I liked.

    RIP to a super star and a terrific man.

    Paul Evans…(“SEVEN LITTLE GIRLS SITTIN’ IN THE BACK SEAT”, ‘HAPPY GO LUCKY ME”)

    John Luongo…He was the visionary that brought his passion to the audience and never took away from the act. He let the acts be the show and he was the curtain and the stage on which they performed. Never be another that loved the music, the artist and the process. He made music fun and that is the way it is supposed to be. :)

    I remember watching Bandstand religiously.it was a major influence for me getting into music. I met Dick once in the makeup room before a STAR SEARCH taping ( i was the music director, he was a guest judge). We were getting made up at the same time next to each other and we chatted a bit about his son Rac who i was also working with on the new version of the GONG show and about music. he was so kind and friendly. R.I.P. , Dick..

    JOEY CARBONE

    Memories of Dick Clark and old friends keep coming back. My first DC memory is when my brother went to the show with Duane Eddy, and he said the girls came up to him afterwards and asked what instrument he played. He said he was in the back and that was why they didn’t see him. Joe Wissert was my favorite dancer, and he went on to a great career in the music biz. (hi Joe!) Jerry Blavat, of course, is immortal like DC himself.

    No one seems to be mentioning the Dick Clark Show that was on Saturday nights, but I could still sing the Beech Nut commercial if pressed. hello out there to all you Dick Clark fans, esp those who grew up in Philly and were right there.

    JULIE LIPSIUS

    • Artie Wayne Says:

      GLAD YOU MENTIONED THAT JULIE. FOR THE FIRST SEASON OF THE DICK CLARK SATURDAY NIGHT SHOW AT THE LITTLE THEATER ON 44TH ST. IN NEW YORK, I ATTENDED THE DRESS REHEARSAL IN THE AFTERNOON OR THE ACTUAL SHOW WHEN IT AIRED THAT EVENING.

      I WAS 15 YEARS OLD AND I PROMISED MY MOTHER TO GET BACK HOME TO THE BRONX BEFORE DARK. MANY TIMES I HAD TO LEAVE BEFORE THE HEADLINER CAME ON. BUT I DID STAY TO THE END OF THE FIRST SHOW AND MET AL KOOPER (BLOOD, SWEAT, AND TEARS) AND BOB GAUDIO (THE FOUR SEASONS) (WHO WERE ALSO 15) AND PLAYNG WITH THE ROYAL TEENS (“WE LIKE SHORT SHORTS”).

      I ALSO MET THE LOVELY PRESIDENT OF THE JERRY LEE LEWIS FAN CLUB WHO DEBUTED THE KILLER’S NEW SINGLE, “GREAT BALLS OF FIRE”!

  17. Trade Martin Says:

    Artie…., I did Dick’s TV show once with my charted Coed recording, “That Stranger Used To Be My Girl” and his radio show twice after that….., he was always very gracious to me and all his guests. The only person I ever met that was super angry with Dick was Alan Freed….., man, did Alan “blow up”.when I mentioned appearing on Dick’s show….!!! I was blind-sided….!!! But God bless the both of them for spinning our records.

    Thanks so much for adding our video…., “DICK CLARK REMEMBRANCE TRIBUTE” to your personal tribute. We are honored to be included with you…..!!! Warmest regards, Trade.

  18. stephen craig aristei Says:

    Artie, you, just like Dick Clark are a part of possibly the most important era of music and you are both definitely “one of a kind” ! My heart goes out to Kari and the rest of Dicks family (both working and personal) and to all his friends, for their tragic loss!
    Best,
    stephen-craig aristei

  19. Rod Carson Says:

    I didn’t know Dick Clark well, heck we only met a few times. The first was as a teenager when I was on the original American Bandstand in Philly. No, I was not a regular, I went twice. On the second time, I presented the Key to the City of Coatesville, PA to him on camera. I remember I was in awe of him, nervous as Hell, and I have no recollection of what I said. I do remember he made me feel very much at ease though. Years and years later, after I had moved my way up the radio ladder in Philly, I was in California and found myself in his presence at some function. There were just a few people around him talking about this and that, and I once again had that feeling of “awe.” Not wanting to be silent, I blurted out, “You know Dick, I was on American Bandstand in Philly and presented you with the Key to The City of Coatesville” and without skipping a beat he said, “Was THAT YOU!!” Of course he didn’t remember, of course he got that kind of thing all the time, but he personalized his response to make me feel better. He was that kind of guy. A truly nice guy. We met a few times after that and would laugh about it. Although, I don’t think he remembered that either.

    Rod Carson
    Formerly with WIBG, WMMR, Host of Rock & Roll Roots

  20. Ronnie Allen Says:

    I had the pleasure of speaking to Dick Clark on the phone while doing research for Casey Kasem. Dick was extremely nice during our brief conversation and that was a very special thrill for me that will always be a precious memory.

    Like the “Queen Of The Hop” in Bobby Darin’s 1958 top-ten hit, I tuned in Bandstand every day. As I look back, I now realize more than ever what a special time that was in my life.

    Though Dick did not originate the “Bandstand” concept, he was the person who turned it into a phenomenon, probably even beyond his wildest dreams.

    It was Dick Clark and (locally) Clay Cole who, more than anyone else, made me want to interview rock and roll stars “when I grew up.”

    I express my condolences to Dick’s family, his friends and everyone in the world whose life was touched by this incredibly gifted and generous man.

  21. brian gari Says:

    I helped Dick Clark & he helped me. I told him of the 3 shows I danced on and he found them for me! I had his official Bandstand autograph paper which he wanted very badly so I sent him that. Great to me–so was Kari.

  22. Michael Ochs Says:

    Before there was a Michael Ochs Archive, I gave a lot of photos to Dick for one of his T.V. shows. Turns out, he never kept photos of the early days. I gave them to Dick freely and he sent me a check for $1,000 – unsolicited; thusly giving me the idea to make my photo collecting hobby a business.
    Over the years I got to hang out with him and was amazed that a man so driven could be so down to earth.
    He lives on in all the people he helped.
    Michael Ochs

  23. Denise Ferri Says:

    I was very blessed to appear on American Bandstand in 1960 with my group The Delicates.I have a clear memory of how we sat in his office and went over what our interview would be..It went something like this..

    Dick asked us where we were from and how we got our name, I told him my family owned a delicatessen in Belleville, N.J. and that’s how we came up with The Delicates.
    Dick said that was great and asked us a few more questions.

    After our performance Dick interviewed us and asked us how we got our name, when we told him it was from my parents Delicatessen..he said “great, you could have called yourselves the Salamis”.That statement of course got a big laugh from the audience and us as it was a total surprise..I will never forget that day.

    Thank you Dick Clark for always being there .You will never be forgotten.

    With love,
    Denise/theDelicates


  24. Neil Merryweather Dick Clark and American Bandstand was on every day when I got home from school ! I credit that show and the first time I saw a live rock band at my high school with giving me the bug! The need to make rock music! Like Dick always said of the records he played and the countless acts he helped break … “These records make up the sound track of our lives” …the world’s greatest DJ is gone! Thank you Dick,,,,RIP


  25. Dick Clark, what can we say about this wonderful man, one of the very many remembrances we will always have in our hearts is that every time we appeared on American Bandstand Dick would stop by our dressing room, stick his head in and very loudly say to us “Gentlemen, gentlemen!”, he would say this every time we went on his show and we would always laugh. One day on another of our appearances Dick stuck his head in the dressing room door again and said “Gentlemen, gentlemen!”, this time we playfully pulled him in and said “Dick why do you always say “Gentlemen, gentlemen!” every time we come on your show, he looked at us with a playful and mischievousness look and said “I just want to make sure you’re all still gentlemen before you go on”!!!!, we all fell on the floor in fits of laughter!!, God bless Dick Clark, with love and respect. From the Commodores. WAK, Clyde and J.D.

  26. Artie Wayne Says:

    Transcribed from EMAILS and COMMENTS ON FACEBOOK…

    Carole Bayer Sager…(“GROOVY KIND OF LOVE”, “ARTHUR’S THEME”) he was a giant in the history of pop music!

    Barry Melton… (“COUNTRY JOE AND THE FISH”) Yes, Dick Clark made a positive impact on my life. I’m sad to hear of his passing.

    Pamela Kath Solomon… excellent comments and remembrances of Mr Clark…thanks Artie!

    Tom Tom Slocum… Like our dear friend
    Ahmet Ertegun, Dick Clark, was instrumental in changing the social fabric and cultural affairs, i.e. Civil rights and much more in america , therfore the globe..A Good Good man RIP Dick.
    .
    Aisha Yoshi…Oh No! ’World’s Oldest Teenager’ Dick Clark Dead at 82 http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory/american-bandstand-host-dick-clark-dead-spokesman-paul-16165635#.T5DLbtWdb6M

    Bob Garcia…Never saw Dick in color. He was always a black and white presence on a Hallicrafters 12 inch tv.

    Neil Merryweather…Dick Clark and American Bandstand was on every day when I got home from school ! I credit that show and the first time I saw a live rock band at my high school with giving me the bug! The need to make rock music! Like Dick always said of the records he played and the countless acts he helped break … “These records make up the sound track of our lives” …the world’s greatest DJ is gone! Thank you Dick,,,,RIP

    Jean LaMond… Dick Clark has been in my life for over 53 years. I remember watching the American Bandstand Show as far back as 1958. In 1959 he first reported the tragic plane crash February 3rd of Richie Valens, Big Bopper and Buddy Holly. That same year he celebrated his 30th Birthday with Danny and the Juniors singing At the Hop! Chubby Checker doin’ the Twist in 1960 and Twistin’ U.S.A. Frankie Avalon sang Venus, Fabian Singing Doc Pomus Composition “Turn Me Loose” and my father Hatin’ It! Neil Sedaka singing ” Breaking Up is Hard to Do” and going to Number 1 in the Nation! Dion and the Belmonds with Teenager in Love!The Famous Rate a Record Bits! All the Young Dancers on the Floor! Dick Clark was a Great Business Man and branched out to Game Shows and Bloopers with Ed Mc Mahn in the 80’s. He had a Wonder “Full” Life! I will remember him every New, New Years Eve…….From this Year Forward…..R.I.P. Eternal Teenager Mr. Dick Clark!

    Crystal Spring … Thanks Artie for your post. I read the comments on wordpress.com and I appreciate the heartfelt words of respect for Dick. I know he changed my teen age years for the better opening up doors I would have never dreamed were possible. He was one of a kind.

    Cornell Gunters Coasters…WE REMEMBER BEING ON AMERICAN BANDSTAND WITH DICK MANY YEARS AGO HE WAS THE GREATEST THEN AND HE WILL ALWAYS BE AMERICAS TEENAGER.WE WILL GREATLY MISS HIM AND WHAT HE STOOD FOR BUT WE BELIEVE THESE LEGENDS ALL WILL LIVE ON ALWAYS. OUR HEARTS AND PRAYERS TO THE FAMILY, FRIENDS AND FANS…DICK CLARK WILL ALWAYS BE HERE MAKING SURE ROCK N’ ROLL IS HERE TO STAY !!!!

  27. George Galfo (The MYSTICS) Says:

    For The Mystics, having appeared on American Bandstand numerous times, Dick Clark’s passing is intensely personal. He was more than just a pioneer and an icon. He was an instrumental part of our early careers and we are forever grateful. From the bottom of the hearts of the original and current Mystics, we mourn the passing of a legend and a friend.

  28. Steve Owen Says:

    Regarding Dick Clark…he championed all forms of rock and roll in those early days, often playing many black groups I.E. “race music”
    as it was often called, having them appear on Bandstand.Thus breaking the color barrier and promoting integration. In this way I feel he promoted Civil Rights. He was a true pioneer who brought rock and roll to mainstream…those who knew him say what you saw on the tube, was exactly how he was in person, low keyed, kind, and unassuming…RIP, Dick!
    Artie on the other thing, The hearing board received my email regarding you, and acknowleged it. I hope you are able to keep the
    treatments going…
    Best to you.

  29. david chackler Says:

    artie..
    Dick Clark was a class act…he was a very important part of my early career in the music biz….i was so sad to hear the news….RIP Dick ! and an eternal thak you !
    david chackler

  30. Artie Wayne Says:

    Transcribed from COMMENTS on FACEBOOK…

    Jimmy Clanton (“JUST A DREAM”)…How well I remember that Dick presented me with my gold record for ‘Just a Dream…and , of course, the countless times I was on BANDSTAND , THE SAT. NITE SHOWS , AND ALL THE ”’CAVALCADE OF STARS NATIONWIDE BUS TOURS…. GREAT DAYS,,

    JIGGS- THE ANGELS (“MY BOYFRIENDS BACK”) I remember what a thrill it was to do the Dick Clark Show back in the early 60’s. I was recently looking at pictures taken at those shows. It was even better years later doing concerts with him at casinos and other huge venues. I used to make up stories about Dick and us in the back seat of some old classic car and got great response from the audiences. I believe he has been totally taken for granted as he was always around on TV in one production or other. He will always be with us because of his legacy, but will be greatly missed by those of us who directly benefited from his brilliance.

    Best, Jiggs

    Sam Emerson mr. clark always had a smile and a handshake for a “beginning” photographer. a real gentleman that will be truly missed.

    SAM

    I first met Dick Clark in the early 60’s, when I was a promotion
    man for Liberty Records. I visited him at his Philly offices–he was
    always cordial and a gentleman.In later years, when Snuff Garrett and I had formed Viva Records, Dick was working from Hollywood —he always gave our artists a fair showing.

    Still further, when I took over the role as head of WB Music,
    Dick called me for favored rates on sync licenses for our
    music—I didn’t grant them, but we still remained on good
    terms!

    I was teary eyed all day after the announcement of his death.

    Ed Silvers

    “Although Dick Clark was not the first to do what he did, NOBODY did it more successfully. And nobody did it for as long….. and that puts him in a class by himself. And speaking of class, he always had plenty of that. I never met anyone (except for the attorneys for the Hollywood Foreign Press…my idea of a joke!) who didn’t think he was a great guy.” –Steve Paley

    Being on AB was a delight. the whole show dedictated to the music and the fans…..and dick clark was the first to do it in such a big manner. certainly the first to celebrate the spirit of the new music and those who welcomed and lived it. I’ve always doubted whether he would have been so succesful had he tried to be anythign else than what he was….no weird outfit or hip DJ name, not even from a hip trend setting town. a strangely perfect delivery system for parents and cautious broadcasters. One of the unique things about Dick Clark
    was his absolute attention to the details of his guests. He had savant level retention for names and little personal facts. Another icon in the biz with that kind of capacity is Clive Davis….almost total retention of all he takes in. Strange that both of them were so straight, so not musicians themselves, but had such unelivable impact on transcultural aesthetics. One of my favorite takes on Dick was offered by Johnny Carson who imagined Clark getting home from another day of Show Biz moguldom, stepping into his Malibu beach front home…his wife handing him favorite cocktail, they chat for a minute and then he steps out of his house, walks across the beach sand step into the surf and takes a sunset walk upon the water….. what a symbol of exciting times past.

    Terry Kirkman- the Association (“CHERISH”, “ALONG COMES MARY”

  31. Mike Edwards Says:

    Having some free time while on business in Philadelphia a few years back, I did some touristy things. I saw Betsy Ross’ house and also drove out to the former site of WFIL-TV at Market and 46th, from which the early editions of American Bandstand were broadcast. That was a long way! But it was another reminder of how small the business was back in those days and how astute Dick Clark was in developing a simple format that stayed within those confines but yet still spread rock and roll and teen culture to an eager national audience.
    Growing up in the UK, we didn’t get “Bandstand”, “Where The Action Is” or any of the other Dick Clark TV shows. Now, with YouTube, we can see what we missed. We would have loved to have seen those shows! But we did get the music from artists whose careers Dick Clark surely helped: Connie Francis, Freddy Cannon, Chubby Checker etc etc.
    So, thanks, Artie, for bringing together these wonderful tributes from Dick Clark’s fans, friends and associates.

  32. Artie Wayne Says:

    Transcribed from E-MAILS and COMMENTS on FACEBOOK…

    Dick Clark was an icon and the bridge for many generations. Always decent, always consistant, always making othe people comfortable.

    It was an honor to work and play with Dick, whether on American Bandstand, traveling with him on tour, or just being his friend out of the spotlight. He helped me and many of my friends become part of Rock & Roll History.

    Dick, we will all miss you.
    Thank you,

    Lou Christie

    Sam Emerson… mr. clark always had a smile and a handshake for a “beginning” photographer. a real gentleman that will be truly missed.

    D.C. LARUE…He was an amazing man. I was never on his program because he and Morris Levy had had a falling out. But he was always the kind of man who when he spotted me would run over to greet me, call me by name and acknowledge my contribution to disco. I always felt special when I was around him. Believe it or not I think that was one of his talents…to make people feel special.

    D.C. DAVID

    Artie,
    The last time I was with Dick Clark was at the iridium with Les Paul, it was a love fest, since then Les has passed and now Dick has joined him in rock n roll heaven along with many of the greats, wonder if they lip synch or perform live? Does GOD have enough money to pay the band scale. they have to send out for Jimmy Hoffa.

    Joey Reynolds…(Talk Show Host)

    “Although Dick Clark was not the first to do what he did, NOBODY did it more successfully. And nobody did it for as long….. and that puts him in a class by himself. And speaking of class, he always had plenty of that. I never met anyone (except for the attorneys for the Hollywood Foreign Press…my idea of a joke!) who didn’t think he was a great guy.” –Steve Paley

    Gregory Sill (Film and TV music supervisor) I am not at all “bragging”, because I WILL ALWAYS LOVE THIS REMARKABLE HUMAN! I WANTEE TO SHARE IT BECAUSE HE HAD JUST TOLD ME ONE OF THE DIRTIEST JOKES I HAD EVER HEARD. LIKE I SAID PREVIOUSLY: COLORBLIND, A RISK TAKER AND A BEAUTIFUL HUMAN. R.I.P. my friend. AMERICAN DREAMS SHOULD AND WILL BE SYNDICATED. BEST JOB I EVER HAD. THANK YOU FOREVER. AN ICON NEVER TO BE REPLACED. PLEASE. NOT “RYAN SEACREST’S ROCKING’ EVE!

    Roger McGuinn- The Byrds (“Mr. Tambourine Man”) …God bless you.

  33. Artie Wayne Says:

    WHEN I ASKED BEN FONG-TORRES iF HE’D LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE TO MY DICK CLARK PIECE HE TOLD ME ABOUT AN ARTICLE HE WROTE COMING OUT IN THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER IN JUST A FEW HOURS…

    “Dick Clark served up what he called “Japanese strawberries” during my visit to his home in Malibu for a Rolling Stone interview one afternoon in 1973. They were fresh berries, dipped in brown sugar and topped with sour cream. Delicious.
    We then proceeded to spar. Representing a magazine that thought of Clark as a greedy exploiter of pop culture, an insatiable money-grubber with countless business ventures who produced and often hosted game shows, lowbrow bloopers shows and awards ceremonies, I asked why he had to get his hands into everything. Clark smiled at this naive, long-haired inquisitor from San Francisco. “The problem with you,” he said, “is that you’re a liberal, and I’m a f–ing whore.”
    Of course, he was effing right.
    Clark, forever known as “America’s oldest teenager,” was 43 when we met in Malibu. I respected that he was who and what he was, and he made no apologies. Although the article was timed roughly for the 20th anniversary of his becoming a host of the original American Bandstand in Philadelphia, I was visiting his office, then his Malibu home, for a profile, not a tribute.”

    FOR THE RIVETING ARTICLE THAT APPEARED IN TODAY’S HOLLYWOOD REPORTER BY BEN FONG-TORRES CLICK ONTO http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/dick-clark-death-ben-fong-torres-rolling-stone-memory-315826

  34. Laura Says:

    Dick Clark was truly a legend in his own time. This is perhaps a phrase that’s overused, but I can’t think of any better way to describe the man who is as synonymous with rock and roll as Alan Freed, and who was instrumental in the success of so many performers of my generation. Everyone, everywhere, knew Dick’s name. Although he went on to host other TV programs, like Pyramid, Dick will always be best remembered for ‘American Bandstand’ and for the impact he had on pop and rock music, and the youth of this country. Tony Orlando said it best: “Only God is responsible for making more stars than Dick Clark.” R.I.P., Dick, and thank you.

  35. Chazz Dixon Says:

    If Dick Clark had not been on the tube daily when I was a kid would I have become a songwriter or an artist, perhaps not. Thank you Mr. Clark


  36. Artie, thanks for providing the forum, and the invitation to contribute. When as a 7-year-old I saw Jerry Lee kick over that piano bench on “AB,” my course in life was just about set, for better or worse. In my teens, I never missed “Action,” another ground-breaking show. As an adult, I avoided DC’s game shows and blooper “specials.” They were merely inventory for commercials and I had other stuff to do. The NYE specials were always fun and a time to reconnect with the good times we had with him as kids. He made no bones about being in the business of music and entertainment, and built a broadcast empire, with a lot of help from the people who worked for him, in the trenches, making it happen. But it was his vision. Dick Clark lit the path for everyone who followed. Rock in perpetuity, indeed.

  37. don Oriolo Says:

    What can you really say about a legend…and one who sprang from a city not that far from where you grew up. American band stand was a “must watch” every day after school….my sister would grab me and make me practice the Lindy with her as we watched our favorite “regulars” dance the newest steps, and wear the latest trends. Dick always seemed like a “Kid Adult” …an adult who was part of our world..it was safe to share kid likes and dislikes with him without him telling our parents. As the years passed, and I went through the ranks in the Music Business, everywhere you looked Dick Clark was still there in a big way! Never aging, never tiring, always smiling. Needless to say the few times I met him I felt like I knew him my whole life…because I really did, from years of watching him for decades. I think he got that a lot…people expecting that he should know them, like we knew him…he was gracious and always played along…treating you like yes, he did indeed know you as well as you knew him…I think that was a big part of his charm…along with brains, business sense, finger on the pulse, and overall good ears. RIP legend, Dick Clark…America’s oldest teenager….Don Oriolo


  38. He took time out of a very busy schedule to give me a telephone quote about his friend Connie Francis. This was in 1995, when I was working on the Connie Francis Souvenirs box set. I perceived him as very straightforward, very no-nonsense. He didn’t like to waste time. That said, he gave me a great quote which we used on the very first page of the liner notes. I remember, after speaking with him, thinking how different he sounded on the phone than on the air. Then I played back the tape I’d made of our conversation. Damned if that famous Dick Clark/Bandstand voice didn’t come booming out at me! Amazing.

  39. Kevin L. Goins Says:

    I didn’t meet Mr. Clark in person but we communicated via fax many times when I was working for Brunswick Records regarding video tape licensing and other matters. In 1998, I had sent a letter asking him could he grant David Nathan (of Blues & Soul Magazine) an interview for the liner notes of a Jackie Wilson CD that was in the works. The next day, he faxed a response, granting us permission to interview him. The last line in the letter got to me – “Thank you again, Kevin, for thinking of me.” I wish I still had that letter (was lost in a storage move). I’ve always said to folks that two men who shared the same initials inspired me to be in the music biz – Don Cornelius and Dick Clark. Gonna miss both men.

    Regards,
    Kevin Goins


  40. Artie, re Dick–He was one fine gentleman, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to call him “friend” over so many years (decades, if you will). Take care. Best, Bob

  41. Country Paul Payton Says:

    Artie, great job on putting all this together. I never watched Bandstand, but in he ’50s, his Saturday night show was my visual window into the world of rock & roll. (I had the NYC rock stations the rest of the time!) I think the most telling photo in your amazing array is the one with the Everly Brothers, Jackie wilson and Clyde McPhatter. I can just imagine how they’d sound together, just harmonizing and trading leads – and it would be perfect!

    Thanks for gathering all these outstanding commens. And PS to Denise Ferri: I was just listening to “Black & White Thunderbird” in my car yesterday on a CD I put together for just such road trips. what a cookin’ track – you ladies rocked!!!

  42. Wedigo Watson Says:

    Artie, thanks for putting all of these great tributes and reminiscences together. I was a young teen living in the deep south in a very rural area…out “in the sticks” as they used to say.
    Watching American Bandstand was one of the things that helped put great music and fun into my otherwise hum-drum life. Couldn’t wait to get home to watch the likes of Dee Dee Sharp teaching us the mashed potatoes, seeing singers like Bobby Rydell, groups like The Orlons and my personal fave Mary Wells and countless other legendary singers/groups. Dick Clark was such a large part of my music landscape and I’ll always be grateful to him for that.
    R.I.P. Dick Clark !!


  43. Artie, thanks for this awesome tribute. Dick helped kick start my career many years back, when I approached him to produce a live new version of American Bandstand and he was intrigued and gave me the greenlight. I think he was most impressed with my passion and enthusiam towards the project and I became the Producer of the show, and the show ran 3 years in Lake Tahoe to sold out audiences, AC and other markets. We did have some issues with a few bad apples along the way, but Dick stood behind me consistantly and helped me through those issues. I then produced a few other shows with him and he and Kari were always very supportive. I remember him calling me a “doer” . He knew I got things done, and he liked that. He always showed up when he said he would, and when he did lash out, it was always for the benefit of the show and to make all of us better at what we did. I have great memories and he will never be forgotton, R.I.P Dick, your friend Barry Summers


  44. What a wonderful tribute to Dick. Like everyone in my generation, he was a part of my childhood. I remember rushing home from second grade to watch American Bandstand and trying to learn all the new dances. I was lucky enough to meet Dick several years ago when I interviewed him for a documentary. Not only was he warm and gracious, but, like me, an animal lover. It seemed that every day was “bring your dog to work day” at Dick Clark Productions.
    We’ve lost an icon.
    New Year’s Eve will never be the same.
    Carolyn Travis
    Producer, “Airplay: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio”.

  45. lisette Says:

    Hi there, i know i speak for alot of dancers when i say it was a sad day in our lives when we heard of dick’s passing but the memories we have from dancing on the show and all the great times & friends we made and still have will last forever. i danced from 1975-1981. i was so excited to get that invite in the mail. i would drive every six weeks from san diego because i was still in high school. i remember my first day like yesterday, being mesmerized by all the dancers, their clothes, the set, and the icon himself, dick. i was surreal. i was a bit shy but as i kept getting asked to come back and became a “regular” i came out of my shell, became wild and crazy. dick always used to comment on what ever i had on when we were in the bleachers. i always seemed to get caught with gum in my mouth, hence he called me the “gum chewer”. he had a real cool sense of humor. he looooved the disco years (quoting him) “they were his favorite”. i loved going to the office and seeing the dogs run around, like being at home! so many great memories to list, but dick & american bandstand gave me 6 of the best years of my life and if i could do it all over i would. i thank you from the bottom of my heart for the experiences of a lifetime and the opportunities you gave to countless bands/singers.my love goes out to your family and someday we’ll meet you again up under that great disco ball up in the sky..”so long for now”
    Lisette St.Claire aka Disco Liz, the gum chewer! ;o)

  46. Dino Schofield Says:

    I don’t think anyone who had the pleasure of dancing or simply attending American Bandstand, the “Action” beach dance series and New Year’s Rockin’ Eve doesn’t cherish their memories of the experience, the musicians,the shows and the friendships. Even the Kentucky Fried Chicken given to us for lunch. I got to be a part of all of it from 1972 through 1976. Dick’s passing saddened so many generations because he represented so much of the high points of our youth. Dick celebrated, for all of us, our style, music, dance,and the shear joy of it all. There’s no question, I give it a 10!

  47. robert moreno Says:

    he was truly a great guy along with his wife who were always so nice to all of us….not only did i dance from 79-82 on bandstand i also went to all the ama’s the night time show and new years rocking eve.what a blessing to have most of all this taped in our back yard to make it easy to get to…dick thanks for all the memories,you will be missed !!! robert

  48. Bunny Gibson Says:

    Dick Clark as been in my life since i was 13 and danced on his Philly AB show. He is like part of my family! We thought of him like a “Father” figure and Kari was our “Mother”.

    On May 8th, “Dancing with the Stars” gave their Tribute to Dick Clark and Steve Colanero and myself (Philly AB Regulars) and a group of wonderful LA Regulars were at DWTS in honor of Dick.

    DWTS’ Judge, Carrie Ann Inaba, became an “Honorary Bandstand Club” member and she said that if it wasn’t for AB, there wouldn’t have been a DWTS. That says it all. Only Dick Clark could have done that – God Bless you Dick……God Bless you Kari……

    Bunny Gibson – Original American Bandstand Regular – Philly

  49. Steve Colanero Says:

    Dick Clark was a mentor and has inspired my life. As a regular on the Philly AB show from late1959 to 1962, I watch this man grow in business and his discipline show me the way to succeed in my life. I met many personalities, on the dance floor and on the stage. I will miss Dick but he has given me many fond memories.

    Steve Colanero- Original AB regular

  50. David Larkin Says:

    I will always cherish the great opportunity I had dancing on Amrican Bandstand from 68-75 and being there for the 50th anniversary too. When I started on Ab it was taped on vine and the osmonds performed on one of the shows. When it moved over to the ABC lot I remember Jenny Rodgers had his son with him.saw Billy Preston,Smokey and a lot more performers over the years.The most inportant thing I rembered is at the 50th Dick started to tear up when he was talking to us about some of the memories and how the kids played a big part of his live. Well Mr Clark you have played a big part of my live and will always will.May you R.I.P. and never forgotten for all that you have done to bring all types of music and people together. Thank you Dick for your kindness .


  51. I had the pleasure of being a Regular on American Bandstand from 1975-1980 during the Disco years. Dancing on the show gave me friends for life, self confidence and wonderful memories. I felt like we were the luckiest teenagers in the world. Dick Clark had the power to make everything seem so easy and attainable. He also gave everyone fatherly love. He made you feel safe and made the set feel like home. It was so pure and honest you can tell it was from his heart. In 2002 at the tapping of American Bandstand 50th Anniversary when Dick Clark first came on stage to talk to us. He had not seeing us (Many American Bandstand Dancers from 50’s to 89)in a huge group like that in awhile. It was before the show started taping. He had to try and hold back his emotions. He would always call the dancers his kids

    I feel very fortunate that I had stayed in contact with him and his wife Kari. He knew my feelings for him and Kari. He knew my love and appreciation for American Bandstand. I had told them I was now a Realtor having worked in Beverly Hills for many years for PRC Realty and now I am currently working for Century 21 Hollywood since 1990’s selling Estates, Commercial Buildings and large Apartment Building. I like so many learned many things from Dick Clark.


  52. Very descriptive article, I loved that a lot. Will there be a
    part 2?

  53. Bunny Gibson Says:

    The LA Regulars and myself went to Dick’s Star on April 18th in respect. We did a prayer circle for Kari and his family. It was good to get together – we are all part of the AB family – forever!


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