Breaking The Motown Sound Barrier- Part Two In The Series – What’s Goin’ On?

September 23, 2006

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Although Motown had been having hits produced in Hollywood for the Jackson Five and Michael Jackson, the move to the West Coast from Detroit allowed Motown more time and money to develop new artists, like the Commodores, Lionel Ritchie, and Thelma Houston, songwriters like Michael Masser, Patti Dahlstrom, and Clifton Davis. The producers that came into their own during that time, included Freddie Perren, Deke Ritchards, Fonse Mizell, Hal Davis, Jerry Marselleno and Mel Larson. Only a handful of those who had hits back in Detroit were able to make a successful transition. the first was Marvin Gaye, who initially met with resistance from Gordy when he delivered his landmark album, “What’s Going On’?” Berry wanted to continue his persuit of “The Sound Of Young America”, making “crossover” singles that dominated the charts. Marvin, on the other hand, wanted to push the envelope with a socially relevant concept album. My friend, Jobete staff writer Al Cleveland, told me that when he heard Marvin working on a new track in the studio, he stuck his head in the door and asked, “What’s Going On?” This led to their collaboration on a song that defined a generation!

Although I was General Manager and Director of Services for Warner Brothers music, I was up at Motown so often people thought I worked there. I would sit in the outer office flirting with the receptionist, waiting to see what producer or artist would walk in next. I remember meeting writer producer Norman Whifield (“I Heard It Through The Grapevine”, ” Cloud 9″) that way. After briefly, but enthusiastically, discussing his body of work he invited me into his office to listen to a track he was starting to work on. I sat there and listened to a track for twelve minutes that consisted of only of an electric bass and percussion and was a bit confused. I asked him if there was a song that went along with it? He started the track again…and sang, “Papa was a Rolling Stone”

Around the same time I cornered Freddie Perren in an elevator, who was cutting Jermaine Jackson and convinced him to cut a Warner Brothers standard, “I Only Have Eyes For You”. I also got Hal Davis to produce “I Want To Be Happy”, from the Broadway revival of “No, No Nannete” for Michael Jackson, which eventually went to newcomer Lionel Ritchie.

Although I was starting to get cuts…they they were slow to be released. Ed Silvers, President of WB Music, thought I was spending too much time at Motown and doubted I’d ever get any of our new material covered. I couldn’t give up now, so in an accelerated effort I got Hal Davis to cut “Doctor My Eyes”, which Jackson Browne wrote and Michael Jackson took to the top ten in the U.K. As my friendship grew with Jerry Marselino and Mel Larson, who produced a top ten hit with Michael on “Rockin’ Robin”, I suggested that they cut as a follow up, “Little Bitty Pretty One”, which I had no interest in. I knew for certain that I had their attention when it became a hit…but I wanted to wait for the right opportunity to present them with an original song that I really wanted them to cut.

In the meantime, over the next few weeks Norman Whitfield let me hear “Papa Was A Rolling Stone”, in it’s various stages of development. There were layers of vocals put on and taken off, sections editited or deleted, countless re-mixes, and finally the last step…the mysterious mastering that set Motown apart from all the rest! That’s when I met Iris Gordy, head of Quality control, who allowed me to watch and listen as she performed her magic!

The Temptations classic was finally released and zoomed up the charts. I remember running into Norman Whitfield in the lobby of Motown, the day the song hit number one on the Billboard charts. He was livid that he had written and produced another smash for Motown…and Berry Gordy hadn’t even called to congratulate him…it was never like this back in Detroit!

Berry’s new aspirations, producing films and his obsession with making Diana Ross a movie star, brought new problems along with new priorities. For the first time in Motown’s history his relationship with everone he had worked with at the label seemed to be on shakey ground! (to be continued)

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3 Responses to “Breaking The Motown Sound Barrier- Part Two In The Series – What’s Goin’ On?”

  1. Phil M. Says:

    Very intriguing stories, Artie, and, as always, especially well-told. The party line on BGJ and Motown has always been so reverential that it has been hard to take at face value, so it’s reassuring to hear what things were really like over there. Not that the truth amounted to “evil” along the lines of, say, Roulette or Duke, but at least the occasional nay-saying helps leaven the Motown aura toward the area of plausibility.

  2. Dave Plenn Says:

    Now I’m jealous, Artie. “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” is one of the best records ever made. It still has magic when you play it today…just one chord…great lyrics….those amazing voices… wah-wah guitar, bobbing and weaving…occasional string lines spicing things up..and the all time best bass line in pop music history. I’m thrilled to know you witnessed it!

  3. James Holvay Says:

    Artie: Great, great story on N.Whitfield’s “Rolling Stone”. As a listener, you assume what you hear on the radio, was conceived in one shot and not pieced together (i.e. “Good Vibrations” and other classic recordings). Sounds like B.Gordy was all caught up w/D.Ross and her movie career, not to give kudos to Norman W. for not only a #1 record but a masterful job of writing, arranging and producing an incredible track. However, you have to hand it to Berry for having the courage, vision and business acumen to pull up stakes and leave his Detroit hit making crew and head for LA. I cried when I saw the documentary about The Funk Brothers and what became of them. But Berry knew that the 60’s Motown Sound was no longer and he had to find another, fresh, young creative team of writers, musicians and arrangers, if he was going to survive in the everchanging record business. Thanks again for sharing your wonderful memories with us.
    James


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