MICKIE MOST  6/20/38

Being an “anglophile” and a British Film aficionado, I was able to understand the thickest English of English accents, so when I first met The Animals in N.Y. 1964 we had no trouble communicating and I even occasionally became an interpreter for them with some of the American press, who had trouble understanding their thick Geordie accents. Before the English Invasion, blues had never been a big part of my life, but hanging with the Animals, who were taking their version of the blues to the top of the charts, changed that. Chas Chandler [bass player for the Animals] and I became pretty good friends and he turned me on to a lot of great blues records I’d never heard, and I went with he and his pals to clubs in Greenwich Village and Harlem that featured the blues. When I went to London for the first time, Chas reciprocated and took me on a tour of the local music scene. We jammed with Howlin’ Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson at Mike Jeffrey’s (the Animals manager) house. He also introduced me to Giorgio Gomelsky, who discovered the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds. Giorgio in turn continued my education by taking me to see an act he was working with, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, featuring a teenage Eric Clapton. We have a lot of English artists to thank for putting the spotlight on a genre of music that might have remained “undernoticed.”


In 1964, also on my first trip to London, Chas Chandler introduced me to his producer, Mickey Most ( Hermans Hermits, Lulu, Nashville Teens), who invited me to the background vocal overdubbing session for “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”. As a songwriter/producer, I was really excited to see one of the worlds top producers up close. Although he was a meticulous creator and knew how to bring the best out of his artists, I believe his greatest talent was his ability to pick hit songs.

Over the years ,as we became friends, he made me acutely aware of the importance of the song and helped hone my skills both as writer and publisher. Mickey always made sure that I was contacted every time he came to New York looking for material, which was flattering, considering that he never recorded any of my songs. Seeing him meant listening to his new product, which never failed to elicit hours of raves from me.

I remember when he came by my office at Scepter records and played “Sunshine Superman” and “Mellow Yellow” by Donovan before he delivered the masters to Epic…you can imagine how blown away I was!
The last time I saw him was in 1980, when I was producing a single on myself as an artist for Chrysalis Music [UK] and had gone horribly over budget. He listened to my tracks and gave me $10,000 in free studio time to finish it up. I couldn’t thank him enough, but my “chemically fueled” out of control ego wouldn’t allow me to complete the project…that’s when I came back to the U.S. broke and brokenhearted…and left the music business.

I’m glad to say I’ve learned from my mistakes. If I have any other regrets, it’s that I didn’t keep up a lot of relationships I made through the years. You don’t meet someone like Mickey Most very often but when you do….you should cherish them.”

From my forthcoming book, “I Did It For A Song”
Copyright 2009 by Artie Wayne
https://artiewayne.wordpress.com


BACK TO THE R.I.P. ROCK N PERPETUITY ARCHIVES https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2008/08/20/rip-rock-in-perpetuity-archives/

BACK TO ARTIE WAYNE ON THE WEB https://artiewayne.wordpress.com

Advertisements

jimi.jpg

JIMI HENDRIX 11/27/42 – 9/18/70

“Once I let my Friend, Ann Tansey, Mercury records A+R director, stay in my New york apartment while I was on the west coast. I didn’t know she had invited her sometime boyfriend, Jimi Hendrix, to stay with her. When I arrived home, I found a nasty note from my neighbor, about my loud guitar playing. The note also said something about people going in and out of my apartment, by way of the fire escape.To this day I don’t know what really happened, but I do admit I was flattered, that he thought it was me playing the guitar!”

From my forthcoming book, “I Did It For A Song”
Copyright 2009 by Artie Wayne
https://artiewayne.wordpress.com


BACK TO THE R.I.P. ROCK N PERPETUITY ARCHIVES https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2008/08/20/rip-rock-in-perpetuity-archives/

BACK TO ARTIE WAYNE ON THE WEB https://artiewayne.wordpress.com

live-thumb.jpg

LOU RAWLS 12/1/33 – 1/6/06

I was aware of the impact that Lou Rawls had on his own generation, Frank Sinatra in particular, I never felt a personal connection with his music until, “Love is a Hurtin’ Thing” [Raleigh/Lindley]. To understand why this was a pivotal point, not only in his career, but to the evolution of pop music in general, we have to examine the times during which the music was created.

It came in the middle of the Civil Rights movement, when “Negroes” were “allowed” to voice a political opinion in music…a time when complacency, turned into, “Say it Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud!. Lou Rawls, obviously wanted to express himself too, but was restrained by his label, Capitol records, who still referred their R and B recordings as “race records”.

Capitol A+ R men made it clear to me, as a songwriter/publisher they were only looking for material that was entertaining, not a song that made a political statement of any kind.

Lou, obviously, jumped at a chance to combine his streetwise eloquence with a song Ben Raleigh and David Linden brought to him, “Love is a Hurtin’ Thing”. Lou’s talking at the beginning of the record was as revolutionary, from a personal and emotional standpoint,
as any music connected with the Civil Rights movement. He even got R and B radio play…a rarity for Capitol records during this time.

For the next few years, he was the only one making records like these that were successful. Then a couple of artists came along a few years later, and added longer talking
segments, liberally sprinkled with sexual references…and a “New” genre was born, with it’s new stars, Isaac Hayes and Barry White.

It was when he signed with Philadelphia International, that he actually sold the most albums, I believe. Gamble and Huff were looking for artists who could be successfully
marketed by their distribution company, Columbia records, and Lou fit the Bill perfectly. He not only was one of the best interpreters of Gamble and Huff’s songs, he had a history of being able to sell albums.

It was around this time that I met Lou. Margo Matthews, who was Ed Silvers secretary at Warner Brothers music, had been his personal assistant for years…and he dropped by to see her one day. As I walked by her office, she called me in, and introduced us. I sat talking with him for a few minutes…and felt like I was reconnecting with an old friend. I
left a few minutes later, to let them talk, but I felt special all day long…not to mention every time I heard one of his recordings from that day on.”

From my forthcoming book, “I Did It For A Song”
Copyright 2009 by Artie Wayne
https://artiewayne.wordpress.com



BACK TO THE R.I.P. ROCK N PERPETUITY ARCHIVES https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2008/08/20/rip-rock-in-perpetuity-archives/

BACK TO ARTIE WAYNE ON THE WEB https://artiewayne.wordpress.com

1082553-musicuk-resized200.jpg

BERT BERNS 11/8/29 – 12/30/67

“The first time I met Bert Berns (“Twist & Shout” “Piece Of My Heart”) was at a little bachelor party Artie Resnick, Kenny Young  had for Jeff Barry when he married Ellie Greenwich. From that time…until he passed…he always had an open door for me.

Although I’m bi-racial, up until the time I met him, my musical tastes ranged from pop to country. Bert helped me get more in touch with my African-American roots through the R+B music he loved so much. I remember the day he wrote “Hang On Sloopy”…he grabbed me in the hall at 1650 Broadway (where we both had offices) and played it for me on his funky, old stand up piano. I was so blown away I couldn’t write for a week!!!

We both had another connection…a serious one. We both had congenital heart problems. I was lucky…In 1965 I was one of the first people in the U.S. to have open heart surgery. I made medical history by walking around 36 hours after the procedure. Bert and I would sit and talk…sometimes for hours…about the operation. How I felt?…Did it make a difference? He knew it was still a big risk and he had a family to consider. Now every time I hear one of his songs…or feel a little of his soul in my own music…I thank God I was privileged to know him.”

From my forthcoming book, “I Did It For A Song” Copyright 2009 by Artie Wayne
https://artiewayne.wordpress.com

BACK TO THE R.I.P. ROCK N PERPETUITY ARCHIVES https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2008/08/20/rip-rock-in-perpetuity-archives/

BACK TO ARTIE WAYNE ON THE WEB https://artiewayne.wordpress.com