When I was plugging songs in the early ‘70s at Warner Brothers music we represented the music of manager, David Geffen’s artists whose roster included the Eagles, Crosby, Stills and Nash, Jackson Browne, and Joni Mitchell.

I had known Joni before socially, and respected her talents, but I never knew how deep she was. It wasn’t until my friend, singer/ songwriter Patti Dahlstrom made me sit down and listen to the “Blue” album and read the lyrics did I fully appreciate what Joni was all about.

I was so hungry to hear more that when David Geffen sent cassettes to WB music to copyright the songs from the yet to be released album, “For the Roses”, I volunteered to transcribe all the lyrics (which I had never done before).

Now all these years later, Patti Dahlstrom emails me a review by her friend Mick Brown from the Daily telegraph in London, of the new Joni Mitchell collection that was just released 

The Studio Albums 1968-1979 by Joni Mitchell, review

Joni Mitchell’s 10 CD box set showcases the greatest female singer-songwriter in popular music, says Mick Brown.

5 out of 5 stars

9:47AM GMT 07 Nov 2012

The last few years have not, one senses, been happy ones for Joni Mitchell. Suffering from Morgellons Syndrome, a rare skin condition, she has all but abandoned music altogether. She has not performed in more than ten years, and not released an album since the stately and haunting Shine, five years ago – a record of melancholic reflections on the environment and mankind’s propensity for self-destruction. Once a force of life, Mitchell now seems distinctly at odds with the world.

This release, then, a collection of her first ten studio albums, recorded between 1968 and 1977, seems particularly timely. It’s a reminder of Mitchell’s musical genius – and I don’t use the word lightly – and an affirmation of her status as unquestionably the greatest female singer-songwriter in popular music, as major a figure in her own way as Bob Dylan.

We’re treading on dangerous ground here. Mitchell has sometimes been described as “the female Dylan” – prompting her retort “why doesn’t anybody ever call Dylan the male Joni Mitchell?” And Bob is clearly a sore point. In her last interview, given to the Los Angeles Times in 2010,she lambasted Dylan as “a plagiarist” and “a fake”. “We are like night and day, he and I,” she said. “Everything about Bob is a deception.” Ouch!

Leaving the question of authenticity aside (and Mitchell’s comments surely say more about her cantankerousness than they do about Dylan’s integrity), any stylistic comparison between the two is pretty meaningless, beginning – and ending – with the fact that both began their careers labouring under the description of folk artists.

But what they do share is an arresting narrative to their lives which has nourished and illuminated their work. Dylan’s story is written in stone: the Minnesota childhood; hitchhiking across America on a pilgrimage to meet his hero Woody Guthrie; his apprenticeship in the coffee-houses of New York; his alignment with the civil rights movement; “the voice of a generation”; Newport, the motorcycle crash. And so on.

Mitchell’s narrative is no less beguiling. The childhood in the Canadian prairie town of Saskatoon; her apprenticeship in the coffee houses of Toronto; an early pregnancy, giving up for adoption the daughter that she felt unable to care for her herself; the migration to California, and her ascent to become the reigning queen of the Laurel Canyon – arguably the first, and certainly the most candid, of the confessional singer-songwriters of the era.

While it was true that Mitchell (winner of eight Grammys in all) sang in a folk idiom she was never a folk singer in the way that Joan Baez defined the type – reviving old ballads or singing songs for to fortify the barricades of political protest.

Form the outset, Mitchell was a writer as well as a performer, her earliest songs studies of lovelorn introspection.

TO READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE BY MICK BROWN CLICK ONTO  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/cdreviews/9655783/The-Studio-Albums-1968-1979-by-Joni-Mitchell-review.html

SPECIAL THANKS TO PATTI DAHLSTROM FOR HELPING PUT THIS ARTICLE TOGETHER. http://patti dahlstrom.com 

Copyright 2012 by Artie Wayne

WHILE FIGHTING LARGE CORPORATIONS WHO ARE TRYING TO KEEP ROYALTIES AWAY ME AND THOUSANDS OF OTHER ARTISTS, SONGWRITERS AND PUBLISHERSMY ONLY SOURCE OF INCOME IS FROM THE SALE OF MY BOOK. ” I DID IT FOR A SONG”, WITH OVER 100 STORIES FROM THE MUSIC BUSINESS OF THE ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. I HOPE YOU’LL CONSIDER BUYING ONE DIRECTLY FROM ME THROUGH PAYPAL FOR ONLY $9.99 AT  artiewayne@gmail.com OR BY CHECK TO…ARTIE WAYNE  P.O. BOX 1105, DESERT HOT SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA 92240

THANKS AND REGARDS, ARTIE WAYNE https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2012/04/10/celebrating-two-million-views-today-on-artie-wayne-on-the-web/

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The first time I met Ron Anton was in 1966 when I was living in NYC. He was a lawyer  at BMI, who was young enough to relate to the songwriters who were making the popular music of the day. My partner, Kelli Ross, and I administered the publishing for some of those popular music makers, who included Joey Levine, Artie Resnick (“Chewy, Chewy”), Leslie Gore (“She’s A Fool”, “California Nights”), Janis Ian (“Society’s Child”), Jazz greats Bobby Scott, and Quincy Jones!

It was always a pleasure to deal with Ron on behalf of our clients, he treated Kelli Ross and me with the upmost respect, during a time when there were no black song pluggers at any major publishing company, and few women owned their own businesses. I never thought of Ron as being part of the establishment because of his sensitivity to the needs of songwriters, composers, and publishers.

In the early ‘70s, when I moved to LA and went to work as General Professional manager for Warner Brothers Music I’d run into Ron, who was running BMI’s west coast office, at industry functions, concerts, openings, etc. and occasionally share a lunch, but I never imagined I had such a strong ally.   

In 1975, I remember Ron coming to my aid, when I went into business for myself after running Irving-Almo Music and BMI wouldn’t give me a $5000 advance against my future songwriter and publishing company royalties. It was standard procedure, when I was at Warner Brothers music, that every new artist David Geffen would sign to his record company would get a $5000 advance from BMI, so I thought I should at least get the same consideration.

When BMI turned me down I was livid, but Ron calmed me down and not only got me the advance I was asking for, but he named my new publishing company, WayneArt Music.

I remember, it was a cloudy afternoon the Wednesday before thanksgiving I was waiting up in Ron’s office up at BMI, for a my check to arrive overnight from NY…but it never came. As the office workers started to leave early for the long weekend, Ron saw me sitting dejected in the outer office, sat down with me and asked, “What’s wrong?”

I told him that I needed that certified check in order to buy a classic 1965 Mustang hardtop at half it’s value by tomorrow or lose the opportunity. He smiled, wrote me a personal check for $5000 and took me to his bank downstairs to cash it, wished me “Happy Thanksgiving” and walked out to his car!

I thought to myself as I returned the money to him on Monday, when my check came in up at BMI, how lucky I was to have a friend like Ron.

Over the years as I drifted away from the music business I lost touch with Ron and his lovely wife Dene, who was my occasional songwriting partner. Then I ran into them unexpectedly at Rick Bolsom’s Cakewalk restaurant in Nashville in the mid-nineties, where I was guest hosting for the evening. We were all so happy to see each other, even though Ron introduced me to the rest of the dinner party as Artie Shaw in the excitement of the moment, Dene hit him on the arm and corrected him. We all had a good laugh and proceeded to have a great evening!

In October of 2000, I was stunned to hear that Ron lost his life in a fire at his home. I’ve stayed in touch with Dene over the years, who has done a remarkable job of keeping Ron’s memory alive.

As we get older, we look back and appreciate the people who made a difference in our lives and Ron certainly made a big difference in mine!

Thank you my friend and may you ROCK IN PERPETUITY!

Respectfully, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com

Copyright 2011 by Artie Wayne https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/about-artie-wayne/

NOW YOU CAN BUY MY NEW BOOK ,“I DID IT FOR A SONG” AT AMAZON or Barnes & Noble or from Smashwords

TO READ A CHAPTER OR TWO FOR FREE CLICK  HERE

TO READ SOME OF THE COMMENTS  CLICK  HERE

BACK TO ARTIE WAYNE ON THE WEB https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/

 

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Artie Kornfeld “The Father Of Woodstock” says, “…God Bless you Artie for keeping the music alive!”

Kornfeld http://www.artiekornfeld-woodstock.com/

Author/ publicist Bob Levinson says,” Dunno if I’m repeating myself here, but want to make sure you know I classify your book as a “must read” for anybody who was in the music business or interested in the music business when it was more about the music than about the business. Gone are the days; shamefully, they ain’t coming back anytime soon.

Warmest regards, Bob www.robertslevinson.com 

Joel Diamond Producer, Says, “Classic pictures Artie…how lucky we are to have had contact and know some of these people first hand who could never be “duplicated” again in our industry…”

Patti Dahlstrom Singer/songwriter, adds, “So exciting and great pictures..but not as good as the stories inside. So many will love this book!”

tommy james (“I THINK WE’RE ALONE NOW”, “CRYSTAL BLUE PERSUASION”) Says: “hey, artie, you are a million hit legend in the music business….still keeping the good times alive with all your great stories and information….keep rockin’!”

I love the songs you got to us. “HEAVY CHURCH”, “PLAY SOMETHING SWEET”, “LET ME SERENADE YOU”, FREEDOM FOR THE STALLION”, and “EASY EVIL”, The fans have put together a few videos for you!

Chuck Negron…3 DOG NIGHT http://www.threedognight.com/index.html

“I Did it for a Song” is a poignant tale told in fast-paced, first person, you-are-there style. You never want to stop reading it as you work your way through the heyday of 60s, 70s, and 80s music at its best, from the Brill Building to the bright lights of LA and all stops in between. Artie Wayne is a born storyteller, and every day of his career in the music business as a songwriter led to simply more and more exciting times. He’s met everyone, knows everyone, and has helped create more good connections for music professionals to have their music heard, recorded, and shared over the years. Outside the music world, Wayne is a just-plain-great writer and he cites Sidney Sheldon’s encouragement, “just write, Artie” as the impetus that set him off and writing. Don’t be offput that this is an e-book. It doesn’t matter if you’re reading it on your computer, your Kindle or the back of an envelope. It’s the inside skinny as he relates stories and answers with the real versions of what happened, because he was there. First-person fun, bright lights, big names, the music industry who’s who that includes those on their way up, and down, in the business. Dare you to put it down, once you pick it up. Artie Wayne: singer, songwriter, wordsmith
As ever,

Dawn Lee Wakefield – Classic rock music – The Examiner    Dawn@dawnleewakefield.com.

ARTIE, AFTER ALL THESE YEARS YOU STILL KNOW HOW TO GET A HIT. MY FRIEND WHO WITHOUT QUESTION HELPED SHAPE AMERICAN MUSIC. I AM PROUD TO KNOW YOU AND CAN STILL CALL YOU MY FRIEND.

I ENJOY READING ABOUT THE JOURNEY MUSIC HAS TAKEN AND THE WONDERFUL STORIES SURROUNDING IT. KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK.

STEVE CROPPER  (“DOCK OF THE BAY”, IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR”)      http://www.playitsteve.com/home.html

Stephen-Craig Aristei , independent film and TV music supervisor comments, “The pictures and the stories are all “greats”…When people read your book, they will realize how each and everyone of their lives was touched in some way, by what you did…We were a part of the industry when “people had fun” with what they did….Joel is right when he says “we are all so lucky to have had contact with so many of these people”…..I was blessed to work with, fight with and have success with many of the true “greats” of our industry….And Artie, you are one of them…You are truly the last of that breed of creative individual who truly make the music and the business great….you are one of the “Last of the Greats” ! ! Everyone who has ever loved music, needs to read your book….!”

Bernadette Carroll Says: As Clay Cole said it best “Weren’t We Something”….Thanks Artie!”

Barry Oslander Producer Says, “Artie like you, I have been waiting for this day since I read your book months before it came out and read it in one day…. Your a man who just wrote some more music history which in turn will bring bring back many minds to dreaming of the good old days and the way it was in the days when the music biz was great and we all were starting out and were friends joined by the music in our blood….Good luck with your book.”

Jerry Ross Producer (Bobby Hebb, Keith, Spanky and our Gang) comments, “Artie: New York Yankees 1930….
Lefty Gomez made the well known comment: “I’d rather be lucky than good”
You are blessed to be lucky; being in the right place at the right time, and so good at what you have accomplished…Congrats on your book!!!”

Mike Edwards Says, “Hi Artie. You were kind enough to send me an advance copy of your book, “I Did It For A Song”. Even though it arrived around the Christmas period, I could not put it down. The details of your career in the music business are well told and are fast moving. Anyone who knows, say, New York and Los Angeles, would feel that they were right there beside you as you covered the ground in these cities. I note that you experienced the sting of prejudice but, like our President, you just brushed it off and kept moving, demonstrating to us that, whatever barriers are put in your way, you can still succeed in this country.
 
It is a fun read; whether it is about you trying to get Motown Records to issue a Michael Jackson Christmas album or you trying to collect royalties from dangerous sounding characters in Germany. These are just two of the many incidents that grace the pages of this book. I wish you every success with it, Artie.”
I DID IT FOR A SONG”, perhaps the best ever title of a music industry
book.The title reflects the the entire mentality of the business in an
era  that produced more classic music and creativity then in any other
time in it’s history.The book reveals how it all went down through the
journey of one man …..
Harvey Cooper former head of 20th Century Records promotion.

“Artie, I got your book last night and read much of it through the night you have one incredible career. It’s an honor that you put me in your book literally in the same sentence with Paul Simon… How cool is that! I played a very, very, very small part, but what a part it was. You stopped by my office, at E B Marks Music and my ears heard that Joey Powers demo, Meet Me at Midnight Mary, and it was then I told you, that’s a hit, master it just the way it is. It was then that I told you to take it over to Amy Records. You did that … added a bass and the rest is history. Wow!”

Tony DiGirolamo tvlights@aol.com

Good to hear from you Artie. I love the songs you got to us. “HEAVY CHURCH”, “PLAY SOMETHING SWEET”, “LET ME SERENADE YOU”, FREEDOM FOR THE STALLION”, and “EASY EVIL”, The fans have put together a few videos for you!

Chuck Negron…3 DOG NIGHT http://www.threedognight.com/index.html

Ed Silvers former CEO WARNER BROTHERS MUSICsays, “Forever a great promoter/publisher/writer, Artie has been my artist, my friend, and co-writer through many years of music business. It has always been more than fun to work together!! I wish we lived closer to one another”

 Mike Millius Says: “Dude, The best and most realistic Woodstock Experience I’ve ever read. Honest in it’s telling and observations.

HAVE KNOWN ARTIE WAYNE SINCE THE EARLY AND COLORFUL DAYS ON BROADWAY IN NYC, WHEN WE RUBBED ELBOWS..I BELIEVE HE USED TO BE AFFECTIONATELY KNOWN AS ‘THE SHADOW’ BECAUSE OF THE OUTRAGEOUS HAT AND CAPE-LIKE COAT HE USED TO WEAR..ARTIE HAS DEDICATED HIMSELF TO KEEPING US INFORMED MUSICALLY FROM HIS BROAD LIFE EXPERIENCE IN MUSIC AND LIFE, AND HIS COLLECTED RESPECT FROM MANY OF US WHO HE HAS WRITTEN ABOUT.

FROM ANOTHER BROADWAY SURVIVOR..LARRY, ‘RHINESTONE RABBI’ WEISS.

Your story needs to be told via a film, or even a TV mini-series. It is fascinating!

John Harrold

peggy santiglia davison   (The Angels) Says: “Hey Artie, I always knew you were talented and smart and the Blog is great. It’s so interesting to me because even though many of us were in the thick of it, we didn’t always know what others were thinking or doing behind the scenes. Maybe that’s my take as a performer since I was on the “road” so much back then, but it is facinating to read the stories. Even just reading the comment list, I see the names of some very long ago business and personal friends and it brings back many memories, mostly good:-). Much success to you in all your future endeavors.
Peggy/The Angels/The Delicates

To a long lost friend. Having been part of your life in those wonderful early days and finally reconnecting after all these years I truly choke up with emotion. Oft times life is a bitch but through your incredible pain your presence, your insight, your memories have brought joy to the so many people you’ve met along the way.

I skimmed through the book the first time around but now I’ll eat up every word. Thanks for the great ride…and please don’t leave.

Ira Howard
Irah36@aol.com

“Artie,Those were the days when our business was exciting every day.. I remember so well of what you wrote in your terrific book.. I miss those days & your weekly visits to our office at 1697 Broadway. We have great memories…”

Jay Siegel-The Tokens
jaysiegelandthetokens.com

Linda Perry Says: “Been a long time. So happy to hear you don’t miss a beat. You keep us all informed. Congratulations to a great guy.
Best regards,”

Linda

ann munday Says, “It’s amazing to me that you and I have known each other over 31 years now!
We were such children when we first met!

Congratulations on your passing another milestone. I know how hard you work, and I know how hard it all is for you physically and you’re truly amazing!”

Vikki Sallee-Dillard Says: “Hello Artie, You are the wonderful to provide “THE MUSIC” and all the information that you do. It is a TREASURE to me and others. Thank you Brother Artie. Your are the Best! Rare finds and Memories that most have never seen.”
“Your articles are, without fail, always entertaining, informative, and exciting.  Few people make learning fun like you do.  I love reading about the people behind the scenes of the music I loved so much as a youngster and still love today, and your write-ups about Artie Kornfeld, Russ Terrana, and others like them are so very much appreciated.”

Laura Pinto http://oldiesconnection.blogspot.com/

Bobbi Cowan PUBLICIST Says: “Hey Artie…Adding my congratulations to the growing list of your fans…and the unique perspective you bring to a business that no longer exists.”

Much love,
Bobbi

Don Charles Says: “Congrats, Artie! I’m convinced your blog was instrumental in getting Ellie Greenwich (posthumously) and Jeff Barry inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Thank you.”

“Artie, I’m loving your book and literally could not put it down until Chapter 22 when nature finally came knocking after my drinking an inordinate amount of coffee. Your writing style is lively and conversational. In a previous incarnation as a journalist I learned to “Write like you talk unless you’re from the Bronx.” It appears that you have come along and totally dispelled that adage. I love the story about your standing-up and telling a roomful of people that you don’t have to accept being exploited merely because you’re black; and nobody in the room was even aware of your racial make-up. Too funny. So much for the argument, right?”

Mark L. Ostrovsky
Richard Kimball Says: “Congrats Artie..Obviously you have waaaaaay too much time on your hands!!!!!”

Ash Wells Says: “Congrats Artie!! Truly always awesome & Informative stories which I love to read. Keep Goin’ Strong.. Love Your Work!”

Roger McGuinn Says:

Congratulations Artie!!!

That’s fantastic!!!

All the best,

Roger McGuinn THE BYRDS

: “Artie, you’re a consummate story teller and because we can track your personal history in tandem with the history of rock and roll. You were there, you’re honest about both your failures and triumphs. You da man! Proud to be your friend.”

Much love
John Brahaney

Copyright 2012 by Artie Wayne

WHILE FIGHTING LARGE CORPORATIONS WHO ARE TRYING TO KEEP ROYALTIES AWAY ME AND THOUSANDS OF OTHER ARTISTS, SONGWRITERS AND PUBLISHERSMY ONLY SOURCE OF INCOME IS FROM THE SALE OF MY BOOK. ” I DID IT FOR A SONG”, WITH OVER 100 STORIES FROM THE MUSIC BUSINESS OF THE ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. I HOPE YOU’LL CONSIDER BUYING ONE DIRECTLY FROM ME THROUGH PAYPAL FOR ONLY $9.98 AT  artiewayne@gmail.com OR BY CHECK TO…ARTIE WAYNE  P.O. BOX 1105, DESERT HOT SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA 92240

THANKS AND REGARDS, ARTIE WAYNE https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/2012/04/10/celebrating-two-million-views-today-on-artie-wayne-on-the-web/

 

For the last three years I’ve been writing my book about my 50 years in the music business. I was warned not to write about certain people, certain companies, and certain things which made me want to tell more.

As my blog became more popular with over 1,870,000 VIEWS, I began to get bolder and relentlessly went after large corporations and social networks until they discontinued some of their questionable practices.

I’m proud to have been the first to write about Tommy James’ shocking book, “ME, THE MOB, AND THE MUSIC” and have an exclusive no-holds barred three part interview with my pal from the past and former label mate…probably the only such event where the participants didn’t have to go into the witness protection program right after the show!

In my book, “I DID IT FOR A SONG”, I write about my first hand experiences songwriting (Aretha, Michael Jackson,Tony Orlando, Cher, etc.) producing (the Kingsmen, The Shirelles, the Guess Who) and getting hits for Warner Brothers Music (“You’re 16″, “R+R Heaven”) and Irving/ Almo music (“I Honestly Love You”, “Our Day Will Come”).

I share my private stories about, Carole King, MORRIS LEVY, Neil Bogart, The BEATLES, Jimi Hendrix, SCOTT SHANNON, Eagles, MICHAEL JACKSON, Bert Berns, THREE DOG NIGHT, Alan Freed, BOBBY DARIN, Brian Wilson, PAUL WILLIAMS, Murray The K, TOMMY JAMES and the Shondells, Olivia Newton-John, HERB ALPERT, JERRY MOSS, Don Kirshner, RICK JAMES, Rolling Stones, ELLIE GREENWICH, Clive Davis, Barry White, DAVID GEFFEN, Marvin Gaye, QUINCY JONES, The Rolling Stones, DAVID BOWIE, Phil Spector, AND DOZENS MORE!

 

EXTRA! EXTRA! YOU CAN BUY MY BOOK ,“I DID IT FOR A SONG” AT AMAZON or Barnes & Noble or from Smashwords

TO READ A CHAPTER OR TWO FOR FREE CLICK  HERE

TO READ SOME OF THE COMMENTS  CLICK  HERE

 

Thanks and regards, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com

Special thanks to Sally Stevens for  the Rainbow’s End photopainting on the cover.  http://sallystevens.fineartstudioonline.com/

http://rockphiles.typepad.com/a_life_in_the_day/

http://www.rockphiles.com/rp_artistIndex.php

Copyright 2011 by Artie Wayne https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/about-artie-wayne/

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After 40 years of speculation singer Carly Simon has revealed that the subject of her biggest song, “You’re So Vain” was neither Mick Jagger nor Warren Beatty, but music mogul David Geffen.

Although David admitted to being gay many years ago I always suspected him of being more “heterosexual” than anything. I was at Warner Brothers Music in the early ‘70s when David had his label with WEA and his publishing administered by us.

When WB VP. Mel Bly and I would go with David to a party or a concert, he was always in the company of a beautiful woman who seemed mesmerized by him. In the business world it seemed he was the equivalent of a Rock Star.

I remember one night at the Troubadour , I was sitting with Sonny and Cher, who were about to publicly announce their split. David walks into the room and suddenly his eyes met Chers. It was like the scene out of “West Side Story”, when Tony and Maria meet for the first time and the room around them disappears…leaving them standing in two spotlights!

I shook my head and thought my imagination was running away with me until I saw the tabloids soon after filled with stories of David and Cher’s romance.

Copyright 2010 by Artie Wayne https://artiewayne.wordpress.com/about-artie-wayne/

FOR MORE JUST CLICK ONTO  David Geffen – Most Powerful Man In Hollywood And How He Got That Way!

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